Metropolitan Museum of Art

This tag is associated with 12 posts

UPDATE: Masterpiece by Girolamo Romanino achieves $4,562,500 at Christie’s. [Earlier entry: Looted 16th-Century Masterpiece to go to Auction: Girolamo Romanino’s “Christ Carrying the Cross”]

In an update to our earlier post concerning the looting and restitution of Romanino’s masterpiece “Christ Carrying the Cross Dragged by a Rogue”, the work sold at Christie’s on June 6, as announced in artdaily.org and elsewhere. NEW YORK, NY.- Christie’s Old Master Paintings sale on June 6 in New York was led by the … Continue reading

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Acknowledges Gertrude Stein’s Collaboration with the Nazis

In early March, we published an entry extolling the magnificent exhibition of the Stein collection currently on display at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (“The Steins Collect”). One glaring omission in the Met’s curating of the exhibition was how the collection managed to survive the Nazis’ decimation of Europe’s art collections, particularly those belonging … Continue reading

Looted 16th-Century Masterpiece to go to Auction: Girolamo Romanino’s “Christ Carrying the Cross”

CHRISTIE’S TO OFFER SUPERB 16th CENTURY MASTERPIECE BY GIROLAMO ROMANINO “Christ Carrying the Cross,” Restituted to the Heirs of Federico Gentili di Giuseppe, Will Lead Christie’s Old Master Paintings Auction in New York on June 6. . A magnificent picture of Christ Carrying the Cross is a masterpiece of Girolamo Romanino’s fully mature style and among the most potent and moving depictions … Continue reading

The Great Rembrandt Self-Portrait from Kenwood House now on View at The Metropolitan Museum

Source: Metropolitan Museum.  By special arrangement, Rembrandt’s great “Portrait of the Artist” (ca. 1665), which has never before traveled outside Europe, will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from early April through late May, 2012. Kenwood House, the London museum that owns the painting, will close in April 2012 for renovations. This … Continue reading

Turkey Demands the Return of More “Looted” Artifacts from American Museums

After demanding that New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art return 18 objects of art including several highlights of the Met’s collection that are currently on display in the museum’s Ancient Near East Galleries, the Turkish government has now contacted the Getty, the Cleveland Museum of Art and Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection to present evidence … Continue reading

Museum Acquisition Funds: How the Major Players Continue to Grow Their Collections in Lean Times

Cultural journalist Judith H. Dobrzynski recently reported in The New York Times on the shocking state of the acquisition funds of America’s major museums: Although acquiring art is a core mission, private collectors donate 80 to 90 percent of what is on view in American art museums. Fewer than two dozen museums have sizable nest eggs … Continue reading

Artemisia Gentileschi: The Power, Glory and Passions of a Female Painter, The Musée Maillol, March 14 – July 15, 2012

Artemisia: Pouvoir, gloire et passions d’une femme peintre . The paintings of Artemisia Gentileschi (on show at the Musée Maillol from March 14 to July 15) are so expressive you can practically smell the blood and sweat. They also portray women as assertive beings, capable of giving themselves over to both crime and pleasure (often both at the same … Continue reading

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! featuring “Jo, La Belle Irlandaise” (Portrait of Jo), by Gustave Courbet

During his three-month stay in Trouville in 1865, Courbet attracted a following as a portraitist among the society women at this fashionable resort on the Normandy coast. He possibly encountered Joanna Hiffernan (born 1842/43), a “beautiful Irishwoman,” through his acquaintance with fellow artist James McNeill Whistler, who was also working in Trouville in 1865. This … Continue reading

Joyeux Anniversaire, Rosa Bonheur!

Rosa Bonheur (March 16, 1822 – May 25, 1899) was a French animalière,  realist artist, and sculptor. As a painter, she became famous primarily for two chief works: Ploughing in the Nivernais (in French: Le labourage nivernais, le sombrage), which was first exhibited at the Salon of 1848, and is now in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris. The painting depicts a team of oxen ploughing a field while attended by … Continue reading

Celebrate the great Michelangelo—born 537 years ago today—by enjoying his magnificent studies for the Libyan Sibyl:

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website: Michelangelo Buonarroti  (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome) Date:ca. 1510-1511 Medium: Red chalk, with small accents of white chalk on the left shoulder of the figure in the main study (recto); soft black chalk, or less probably charcoal (verso) Dimensions:sheet: 11 3/8 x 8 7/16 in. (28.9 x 21.4 cm) This … Continue reading

Metropolitan Museum of Art – Allegory of the Planets and Continents: Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (Italian, 1696-1770)

This picture, Tiepolo‘s largest and most dazzling oil sketch, shows Apollo about to embark on his daily course across the sky. Deities around the sun god symbolize the planets and allegorical figures on the cornice represent the four continents. Tiepolo presented this preliminary sketch to Carl Philipp von Greiffenklau, the prince-bishop of Würzburg, on April 20, 1752, … Continue reading

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Acknowledges Gertrude Stein’s Collaboration with the Nazis

In early March, we published an entry extolling the magnificent exhibition of the Stein collection currently on display at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (“The Steins Collect”). One glaring omission in the Met’s curating of the exhibition was how the collection managed to survive the Nazis’ decimation of Europe’s art collections, particularly those belonging … Continue reading